Monthly Archives: April 2017

New book of member

Katy N. Lam, Research Fellow of the research group and Assistant Professor in the Hong Kong Polytechnic University, has recently published a book entitled, Chinese State Owned Enterprises in West Africa: A Triple-Embedded Globalization. with Routledge.

Abstract

This book investigates the globalization process of Chinese state-owned enterprises (SOEs) in West Africa, primarily in Benin and Ghana, based on ethnographic research. It challenges the dominant vision of “a powerful China in Africa”, and argues that the so-called “Chinese business advantages” – monolithic Chinese state and Chinese low cost advantages, are non-viable for sustaining Chinese business development in the continent. Considering the Chinese SOEs globalization process in a relational approach, this book examines how the triple embeddedness (Chinese, African and managerial) shapes the Chinese SOEs globalization process over time and space, in diverse dimensions and among different entities – the Chinese state, Chinese SOEs, Chinese expatriates, the African government, African business partners, African staff, and the African society. It illustrates that the Chinese central state has “retreated” deliberately from its SOE globalization in Africa. The Chinese SOEs and Chinese expats are the major actors in initiating and inventing globalization strategies, facing limited Chinese state support and the African neopatrimonial governance and social contexts. Besides, the personal trajectories (from expatriation to social promotion) of Chinese SOE expats interweave with the globalization-turn-localization of their SOEs in Africa. Rejecting the linear, static and binary vision of “powerful China in powerless Africa”, the present study thus emphasizes power dynamics in Chinese SOEs’ globalization process are organic and pluralistic though in certain extent hierarchical –”second-class”. Time and local relations are key elements constituting the real Chinese advantages for Chinese SOEs vis-a-vis their ultimate competitors – not Western companies, but other Chinese companies.

Table of contents

  1. CHAPTER 1 – INTRODUCTION
  2. CHAPTER 2 – “RETREAT” OF THE CHINESE STATE
  3. CHAPTER 3 – AFRICAN EMBEDDEDNESS AND VULNERABLE CHINESE
  4. CHAPTER 4 – AFRICAN MANAGERS AND WORKERS
  5. CHAPTER 5 – CHINESE EXPATS
  6. CHAPTER 6 – COMPETING FOR THE “CHINESE COMMUNITY
  7. CHAPTER 7 – CONCLUSION

For a detailed table of contents, please click TOC_Chinese SOEs in West Africa

Rich interdisciplinary exchange at the workshop ‘Global South Perspectives’

On April 20th, 2017, the workshop ‘Global South Perspectives’ was held, organized by the research group ‘Migration, China, and the Global Context,’ with generous support of the Max Weber Foundation and the Hong Kong Baptist University Faculty of Social Sciences. The workshop gathered local and overseas scholars to discuss theoretical and empirical perspectives gained in the Global South with the aim of de-centering and revising scholarship from the Global North. It united scholars from a wide variety of regions, including Hong Kong, Mainland China, Taiwan, India, the Phillipines, Pakistan, Turkey, Poland, France and Germany. This rich blend sparked a very fruitful exchange of perspectives and mutual enrichment, and a vibrant and innovative dialogue pervaded the meeting.

The meeting was started by an agenda-setting keynote speech introducing a world-premiering theoretical framework of the concept of ‘cultural inequality,’ by Matthew M. Chew from Hong Kong Baptist University’s Sociology department. The workshop also included six panel sessions on the topics of migration and race and ethnicity, general theory, gender and sexualities, historical approaches, and work and globalizing economies, all of which led to lively debates. The workshop received overwhelmingly positive feedback from the participants.

Some highlights of the workshop included:

  • A discussion of how mainstream ontological and epistemological approaches in the Social Sciences are influenced by notions stemming from Western Philosophy such as dialectics, and how concepts from non-Western Philosophical schools could serve to diversify these approaches.
  • A discussion how the Chinese concept xing could be made fruitful for broader understandings of sexuality.
  • A debate on the greater need to investigate privilege along with discrimination and marginalization.
  • A discussion on the power of social scientists to re-inscribe power relations which they are advocating against, e.g. by using terms with different connotations for different migrant groups.

The workshop booklet can be viewed here.